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Science Seminar Series

Science Seminar Series


October 19, 2010
November 11 One Hundred Years of Biogeographic Change in the Vertebrates of Southern California (San Jacinto Mountains, 1908-2008)

hargrove.jpg
Dr. Lori Hardgrove, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Biodiversity Research Center of the Californias, San Diego Natural History Museum [email protected]

Thursday, November 11, 2010
12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109

Dr. Hargrove is a post-doctoral researcher at the San Diego Natural History Museum.  She has over 15 years of field biology experience including work with endangered species, and she coordinated surveys and developed monitoring protocols for the Coachella Valley Multiple Species and Habitat Conservation Plan.  She recently completed her Ph.D. in Biology at the University of California, Riverside, on Limits to Species’ Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient.  She is currently working on a survey of 20 sites in the San Jacinto Mountains first surveyed in 1908, to see how biogeographic patterns of vertebrate species have changed over 100 years. The work is a collaboration with the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at U.C. Berkeley, where similar work has been done in places like Yosemite.  She is interested in how climate change is affecting biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates. The project website is: http://www.sdnhm.org/research/sanjacinto/index.php. Dr. Hargrove has been the recipient of numerous research awards including a Biological Impacts of Climate Change Research Grant from the State of California and Point Reyes Bird Observatory, and a Mewaldt-King Student Research Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society. 


October 6, 2010
October 7 -- Threats to Cetacean Biodiversity Worldwide

Dr. Thomas Jefferson, Marine Mammal Biologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center   [email protected]

Jefferson_monkey.jpg

Thursday, October 7, 2010
12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109


Dr. Jefferson’s main interests are the development of marine mammal identification aids, and the systematics and population ecology of the more poorly-known species of dolphins and porpoises. Essentially all of his work for the past 10 years has been related to conservation and management of marine mammals threatened by human activities.  He is one of the authors of a well-regarded guide to marine mammals, Marine Mammals of the World: A Comprehensive Guide to their Identification (Academic Press). 

The Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute Science Seminar lectures are free and open to the public.  To attend, simply reserve your space by calling (619) 226-3870.  Space is limited and will be reserved on a first come first served basis.  Register early to secure your space!  To view a list of future seminars, please click here HSWRI 2010 Science Seminar Series.


September 7, 2010
September 9 – Learning in Human-Dolphin Interactions at Zoological Facilities

Dr. Diane Sweeney, Creative Resources Advisor, Dolphin Quest / Quest Global Management  [email protected]

Thursday, September 9, 2010
12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109

Zoos and aquaria are expected to play an increasingly important role in educating the public about marine life and biodiversity in the coming decades.  Thus, it will be important to develop improved methodologies for delivering and assessing zoological park-based education programs.   Dr. Diane Sweeney is the Creative Resources Advisor for Dolphin Quest, which has long been a leader in dolphin research and education programs.  She will describe her research on the learning experiences of guests participating in human-dolphin interactions.  She interviewed participants at three U.S. zoological facilities, including SeaWorld, as part of a doctoral research program in the Department of Education Studies at the University of California at San Diego.  She investigated adult learning, including interviews with 51 participants and an online questionnaire with 933 respondents.  She coded, categorized, and analyzed her data based on frameworks for informal science education from the National Science Foundation and the National Research Council.  She will discuss her findings, the potential mediators of learning in the physical, social, and personal realms, and representations and cultural expectations in such experiences.


June 7, 2010
June 10--Biodiversity in an Urban Environment: Lessons from the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve

Dr. Jeff Crooks, Research Coordinator, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve [email protected]

Thursday, June 10, 2010

12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109

Dr. Jeff Crooks is the Research Coordinator for the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR).  TRNERR preserves, protects, and manages the natural and cultural resources of the Tijuana River Estuary by focusing on research and education with compatible recreation and resource use. The Reserve encompasses beach, dune, mudflat, salt marsh, riparian, coastal sage scrub, and upland habitats surrounded by the growing cities of Tijuana, Imperial Beach, and San Diego. Critical issues confronted by the Reserve include habitat restoration, endangered species management, management of the wastewater from Mexico, sediment management, and the integration of recreation and habitat conservation and restoration. TRNERR is a partnership between the United States and the State of California that links the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), California State Parks, and the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  In addition, several regional agencies and local municipalities share ownership and management responsibilities at the Reserve.


May 3, 2010
May 6--Can We Save the Vaquita?

Dr. Barbara Taylor, Lead Scientist, Marine Mammal Genetics Group, Southwest Fisheries Science Center  [email protected]

Thursday, May 6, 2010

12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109

619-226-3870

Dr. Taylor leads the staff of the Marine Mammal Genetics Group at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center.  She has been an active participant in the IUCN Cetacean Specialist Group and the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission.  She has studied harbor porpoise, harbor seals, bowhead whales and humpback whales, mostly in Alaska.  Since receiving her PhD from the University of California, San Diego, she has focused on identifying units to conserve and testing of quantitative listing criteria for the Endangered Species Act; population dynamics of small populations and population viability analysis; conservation biology; demography; and decision analysis.   She is actively involved in vaquita conservation science projects at SWFSC.  


April 8, 2010
Fisheries and Ocean Pelagics: A Case Study of the Bycatch Triangle

April 8--Fisheries and Ocean Pelagics:  A Case Study of the Bycatch Triangle

Dr. Rebecca Lewison, Assistant Professor, Ecology Joint Doctoral Program, San Diego State University  [email protected]

 April 8, 2010

12:00 noon
Shedd Auditorium
Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute
2595 Ingraham Street
San Diego, CA 92109
619-226-387

Dr. Lewison is an Assistant Professor in the Ecology Joint Doctoral Program at San Diego State University.  She got her Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California at Davis in 2002.  She represents a new generation of computer-savvy scientists who are using geographic information systems to tackle global-scale environmental issues.  She will talk about recent research on the impact of bycatch on marine megafauna (large birds, mammals, and fishes).  Recent work has provided strong evidence for the important ecological role of megafauna in terrestrial, aquatic and marine systems.  At the same time, megafauna populations continue to decline as a result of human activities.  Although these declines are associated with direct and indirect effects of resource and land use, we have little information on how human activities mediate declines because of challenges in detecting, monitoring and quantifying impact on difficult-to-study species.  Using fisheries bycatch as a case study, Dr. Lewison presents a suite of novel quantitative approaches that are helping to monitor and quantify the impact of fisheries bycatch on marine megafauna.  


March 5, 2010
2010 Science Seminar Calendar--Celebrating the International Biodiversity Year

 

March 11 –  Policy Instruments and Economic Incentives for Conservation

Dr. Dale Squires, Senior Scientist, NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and Adjunct Professor, Department of Economics, Department of Economics and Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies UCSD  [email protected]

Dr. Squires is a Senior Scientist at the NOAA Southwest Fisheries Science Center and Adjunct Professor in the Department of Economics and Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego.  He specializes in the microeconomics in environmental and natural resource economics.  He teaches “Economics of Conservation” at UCSD and is the editor of two new books, Conservation and Management of Transnational Tuna Fisheries (Wiley-Blackwell) and Handbook of Global Fisheries Conservation and Management (Oxford University Press).  He is the author of a book to be published this spring, Conservation of Pacific Sea Turtles (University of Hawaii Press).

April 8 – Fisheries and Ocean Pelagics:  A Case Study of the Bycatch Triangle

Dr. Rebecca Lewison, Assistant Professor, Ecology Joint Doctoral Program, San Diego State University  [email protected]

Dr. Lewison is an Assistant Professor in the Ecology Joint Doctoral Program at San Diego State University.  She got her Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California at Davis in 2002.  She represents a new generation of computer-savvy scientists who are using geographic information systems to tackle global-scale environmental issues.  She will talk about recent research on the impact of bycatch on marine megafauna (large birds, mammals, and fishes).  Recent work has provided strong evidence for the important ecological role of megafauna in terrestrial, aquatic and marine systems.  At the same time, megafauna populations continue to decline as a result of human activities.  Although these declines are associated with direct and indirect effects of resource and land use, we have little information on how human activities mediate declines because of challenges in detecting, monitoring and quantifying impact on difficult-to-study species.  Using fisheries bycatch as a case study, Dr. Lewison presents a suite of novel quantitative approaches that are helping to monitor and quantify the impact of fisheries bycatch on marine megafauna.
 

May 6 – Can We Save the Vaquita?

Dr. Barbara Taylor, Lead Scientist, Marine Mammal Genetics Group, Southwest Fisheries Science Center  [email protected]

Dr. Taylor leads the staff of the Marine Mammal Genetics Group at the Southwest Fisheries Science Center.  She has been an active participant in the IUCN Cetacean Specialist Group and the Scientific Committee of the International Whaling Commission.  She has studied harbor porpoise, harbor seals, bowhead whales and humpback whales, mostly in Alaska.  Since receiving her PhD from the University of California, San Diego, she has focused on identifying units to conserve and testing of quantitative listing criteria for the Endangered Species Act; population dynamics of small populations and population viability analysis; conservation biology; demography; and decision analysis.   She is actively involved in vaquita conservation science projects at SWFSC.  

June 10 – Biodiversity in an Urban Environment: Lessons from the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve

Dr. Jeff Crooks, Research Coordinator, Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve [email protected]


Dr. Jeff Crooks is the Research Coordinator for the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR).  TRNERR preserves, protects, and manages the natural and cultural resources of the Tijuana River Estuary by focusing on research and education with compatible recreation and resource use. The Reserve encompasses beach, dune, mudflat, salt marsh, riparian, coastal sage scrub, and upland habitats surrounded by the growing cities of Tijuana, Imperial Beach, and San Diego. Critical issues confronted by the Reserve include habitat restoration, endangered species management, management of the wastewater from Mexico, sediment management, and the integration of recreation and habitat conservation and restoration. TRNERR is a partnership between the United States and the State of California that links the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), California State Parks, and the U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service.  In addition, several regional agencies and local municipalities share ownership and management responsibilities at the Reserve.

September 9 –  Learning in Human-Dolphin Interactions at Zoological Facilities

Diane Sweeney, Ed.D, Creative Resources Advisor, Dolphin Quest / Quest Global Management
[email protected], PH:  619-224-1503, FX: 619-224-3120

Zoos and aquaria are expected to play an increasingly important role in educating the public about marine life and biodiversity in the coming decades.  Thus, it will be important to develop improved methodologies for delivering and assessing zoological park-based education programs.   Dr. Diane Sweeney is the Creative Resources Advisor for Dolphin Quest, which has long been a leader in dolphin research and education programs.  She will describe her research on the learning experiences of guests participating in human-dolphin interactions.  She interviewed participants at three U.S. zoological facilities, including SeaWorld, as part of a doctoral research program in the Department of Education Studies at the University of California at San Diego.  She investigated adult learning, including interviews with 51 participants and an online questionnaire with 933 respondents.  She coded, categorized, and analyzed her data based on frameworks for informal science education from the National Science Foundation and the National Research Council.  She will discuss her findings, the potential mediators of learning in the physical, social, and personal realms, and representations and cultural expectations in such experiences.

October 7 -  Threats to Cetacean Biodiversity Worldwide

Thomas Jefferson, Ph.D., Marine Mammal Biologist, Southwest Fisheries Science Center   [email protected]

Dr. Jefferson’s main interests are the development of marine mammal identification aids, and the systematics and population ecology of the more poorly-known species of dolphins and porpoises. Essentially all of his work for the past 10 years has been related to conservation and management of marine mammals threatened by human activities.  He is one of the authors of a well-regarded guide to marine mammals, Marine Mammals of the World: A Comprehensive Guide to their Identification (Academic Press). 

November 10 – One Hundred Years of Biogeographic Change in the Vertebrates of Southern California (San Jacinto Mountains, 1908-2008)

Dr. Lori Hardgrove, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Biodiversity Research Center of the Californias, San Diego Natural History Museum [email protected]

Dr. Hargrove is a post-doctoral researcher at the San Diego Natural History Museum.  She has over 15 years of field biology experience including work with endangered species, and she coordinated surveys and developed monitoring protocols for the Coachella Valley Multiple Species and Habitat Conservation Plan.  She recently completed her Ph.D. in Biology at the University of California, Riverside, on Limits to Species’ Distributions: Spatial Structure and Dynamics of Breeding Bird Populations Along an Ecological Gradient.  She worked on a survey of  20 sites in the San Jacinto Mountains first surveyed in 1908, to see how biogeographic patterns of vertebrate species have changed over 100 years. The work was a collaboration with the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology at U.C. Berkeley, where similar work has been done in places like Yosemite.  She is interested in how climate change is affecting biogeographic patterns of terrestrial vertebrates The project website is: http://www.sdnhm.org/research/sanjacinto/index.php. Dr. Hardgrove has been the recipient of numerous research awards including a Biological Impacts of Climate Change Research Grant from the State of California and Point Reyes Bird Observatory, and a Mewaldt-King Student Research Award from the Cooper Ornithological Society.  




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